Review: Jekyll’s Mirror by William Hussey

Recommendations, Review
Image from Goodreads
Author: William Hussey

Publisher: OUP

Publication Date: Jan 2015
Source: Review Copy
Rating: 3/5

Synopsis from Goodreads

Sam is a tortured soul, but his darkest hour is yet to come, when he’s invited to take part in ‘Project Hyde’. A new social networking site where users can enjoy total anonymity . . . it’s exhilarating at first, until Sam notices that the other users are becoming obsessed with the program . . . addicted to the cruelty they are inflicting online. Sam watches with a growing sense of horror as his classmates turn into something unrecognisable.

For the truth behind Project Hyde is this: it doesn’t simply change WHO you are, it changes WHAT you are.

One click away from Evil’s new domain. Are you ready to face the truth?

REVIEW BY HARVEY – YEAR 9

Jekyll’s Mirror begins in modern-day Britain with a boy called Samuel Stillhouse. I thought that at the start the book was a rather boring one, things moved slowly and in the first two or three chapters I did consider whether I had picked a good book or not. BUT the next couple of chapters things started to kick off, Sam met Casey, a red-haired American girl from the Deep South whom Sam bumps in to numerous amounts of time throughout this book.

Jekyll’s Mirror really highlights how everyone has an evil side hidden inside them just waiting to pop out. Sam experiences this firsthand as he is picked to carry out this project by his own English teacher.
Sam is a troubled soul following the brutal death of his mother, Sam could not be more vulnerable at this point of his life.
The storyline follows Sam and Casey as they both try to rid the earth of the evil that is plaguing the world. Along the way they come across many complications from being hit by a car to mind controlled waitresses, this book has it all.

The evil and powers of the characters in this book are slowly revealed, but the true meaning of the book is really known throughout. We all have an evil side.
The ending of the book was quite a short one, but it was fast and interesting.
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